Tag - epoxy flooring contractors lancaster

Concrete Moisture Tests : PennCoat, Inc.

Testing Concrete Moisture Putting down epoxy floor coatings, or for that matter, flooring, on a moist concrete slab is not going to have a happy ending. Concrete cures, which means it takes time to develop full strength and give up its moisture. Floor coating will not adhere properly to moist concrete and will be prone to premature failure. Flooring laid on top of moist concrete can create bumps and gaps. In addition, the trapped moisture encourages nasty creatures -- mold,...

Understanding Tech Data Sheets: Impact Resistance

Impact Resistance The impact resistance, or toughness, of a material is its ability to absorb energy without fracturing or rupturing, even if it plastically deforms. Technically, it is the integral of energy divided by volume, aka the stress-strain curve we've discussed in previous blogs. It is similar to resilience, except the upper limit of integration is unrestricted. There are several ways to measure impact resistance, including the Izod Impact Test: and the Charpy impact tests: But the materials we commonly use at...

Technical Data Sheets : Tensile Strength for Industrial Coatings

Technical Data Sheets : Tensile Strength for Coatings Tensile Strength In the last blog, we were squashed, but today we are going to be stretched -- "we" being samples of various coatings and protectants, such as cementitious urethane. Tensile strength is the maximum pull a material can withstand before breaking or otherwise failing. The pulling literally rips intermolecular bonds apart. For the type of materials we use at PennCoat, the test of choice is ASTM International, (formerly known as the American...

Translating Tech Data Sheets – Compressive Strength

Compressive Strength The next stop on our grand tour of physical properties is compressive strength, the ability of a material to resist forces that would cause it to, well, compress. It is a feature of structures and of substances. For the purposes of this article, we are most interested in the compressive strength of chemical-resistant mortars, grouts, monolithic surfacings and polymer concretes, the types of materials we use at PennCoat. Don't Be Tense Compression is the opposite of tension (which we'll discuss...

The Importance of Material Hardness for PennCoat’s Applications

Material Hardness The makers of the coatings and paints we use at PennCoat publish extensive technical information about the ingredients, properties and safety of each product. We use this information when selecting the best product for each application. For example, when we apply a cementitious urethane surface, we are looking for a material that will withstand heavy traffic -- in other words, a hard surface. How Hard Is It? Hardness is a physical characteristic of matter that describes its resistance to indentation,...

What’s the Big Deal with VOC’s?

Volatile Organic Compounds The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency defines volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as "organic chemical compounds whose composition makes it possible for them to evaporate under normal indoor atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure." The term applies to any organic compound that boils at or below 250° C at standard atmospheric pressure. VOCs are usually released into the air from materials containing these compounds. This covers a wide range of materials that we have discussed in previous articles....

Polyurea Expansion Joints by PennCoat, Inc.

Polyurea Joint Filler One of our "go to" products at PennCoat is Spal-Pro RS 88 semi-rigid polyurea joint filler. We find it performs well as a expansion joint filler for indoor concrete floors, especially in retail and industrial applications, where it supports traffic and protects joint edges. The material can also be used to fill the occasional crack in industrial floors. This product isn't recommended for non-breathing flooring systems or in outdoor situations where temperatures can vary greatly year round. Chemistry The polyurea...

PennCoat Installs Slip-Resistant Floors

Slip Resistant Floors Slippery floors are a constant problem in manufacturing work environments.  While a slip-resistant floor is safer for pedestrians and vehicles, especially in environments where liquids spill or accumulate, the downside is that highly slip-resistant floors are harder to clean. Scientists measure slipperiness with the coefficient of friction (COF), which is a scale ranging from 0.01 (the least friction) to 1.00 (or higher for rubber-coated floors). The ANSI minimum COF to be rated as "high slip resistance" is...

Epoxy Coating Failure : Non-Osmotic Blistering

Non-Osmotic Bubbling In our previous article, we took a close look at osmotic blistering and the toll it takes on coated surfaces. In this article, we'll examine the other common mechanism of coating failure: non-osmotic bubbling. Beyond Moisture Damage As we previously explained, osmotic blistering arises from situations in which coated surfaces are immersed in water or subject to continual high humidity. Water, sometimes driven by temperature gradients, gets under the coating surface, vaporizes and causes the damage we call osmotic blistering....

Epoxy Flooring Failure ; Osmotic Blistering

Osmotic Blistering Osmotic blistering occurs when moisture penetrates through the surface of a coating, is trapped beneath the layer of paint or epoxy and creates blisters. It is not an uncommon phenomenon, but the mechanism can be somewhat complex. Generally, blisters form where pressure builds after moisture accumulates at certain locations within a coating film. Blistering is a result of osmosis; non-osmotic bubbling also occurs, but it's caused by a different mechanism. Mechanisms Paints and epoxies form semi-permeable membranes that can resist...